Never Let Schooling Interfere with Your Education.

Ariel Norling here. I write about education, technology, and my adventures in entrepreneurship- i.e. everything that I've learned outside of a classroom's walls. I am often sarcastic, sometimes serious, but always infinitely curious.

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#higher education

Syracuse University researchers use nanotechnology to harness the power of fireflies
Three of my favorite things: Syracuse, fireflies, and science.
Discovered in my first alumni newsletter (yikes!). At least my first thought wasn’t “So this is another random project that is paid for by my tuition” for the first time in years. Because installing solar panels on the less fortunate’s homes really should have been a priority for the university.

Syracuse University researchers use nanotechnology to harness the power of fireflies

Three of my favorite things: Syracuse, fireflies, and science.

Discovered in my first alumni newsletter (yikes!). At least my first thought wasn’t “So this is another random project that is paid for by my tuition” for the first time in years. Because installing solar panels on the less fortunate’s homes really should have been a priority for the university.

Let's Start a Learning Revolution from Skillshare on Vimeo.

tiffanyman:

“The pinnacle of education is not following one particular path to success. It’s knowing that there are many. Everyone should explore, learn … Let’s change the way we think about education.”

http://www.skillshare.com/about/manifesto

Love this video. Skillshare’s manifesto is so true and purposeful. It’s a shame that Michael K. didn’t seem to get this point across at #140edu. Skillshare may not be the right answer for making the changes that they want to make to the education system, but it’s a really good place to start. They have amazing classes about entrepreneurship and skills that most schools don’t teach, which is a shame.

On another note, I’m not in college to get a degree that leads me right to a career. I came to college to learn as much as I could about all of my interests, to find out what it is I really want to do, and to grow up. Yes my student loans are expensive, and I have learned more about myself and my career outside of school, but those opportunities came because of school and are well worth the cost.

It’s definitely time for there to be a collective discussion about what the purpose of a college education is. The Good Magazine article today about the dangers of making college too career focused only seemed to confirm my concerns and highlight the need for conversation.